Top 12 Best Minecraft Books For Kids [2021]

Minecraft For Kids
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Minecraft is a game that truly appeals to gamers of all ages more than most games out there. It’s so accessible yet offers so much possibility for players to exercise their creativity, no matter how mature or young they happen to be.

Among those playing it, of course, are very young children. Suppose you should happen to be a parent or teacher of young Minecraft players. In that case, you might well know that one of the best ways to encourage a child to be literate and expand their vocabulary is to present them with books about subjects that they’re interested in.

Also, given what a cultural mainstay Minecraft has become in the modern age, there are tons of books out there about it, many of them directed at very young children. Below, we’ve listed twelve of the best Minecraft-themed books that young players will enjoy.

Best Minecraft Books For Kids

1. Minecraft For Beginners

Minecraft may be a relatively easy game to start playing, but there’s a definite learning curve to it. After all, there’s so very much to do in the game, and very little of it is spelled out explicitly in the game itself.

Mojang’s official Minecraft For Beginners book is a kid-friendly introductory guide to the game, ensuring that new players aren’t flying blind as they discover the many nuances of the game. More importantly, it also ensures that kids are still reading, even as they get pulled into this highly addictive game.

2. Minecraft: Guide To Exploration

Another official Mojang publication, this one focuses on the thing that, alongside building, you’ll probably spend the most time doing in Minecraft: exploring.

The surface of the overworld alone is larger than the surface of the Earth, after all. This guide will, like the last one, help to ensure that your kids pepper their gaming time with reading, as they’ll quickly learn how important it is to keep themselves informed about the best approach to exploring the sprawling world of Minecraft.

3. Minecraft: Blockpedia

There are not many things that can get kids to peruse coffee table books nowadays. This book, however, is the sort that’ll have themturning pages for hours on end. Designed to look like an actual Minecraft block, this is essentially an encyclopedia of all the different kinds of blocks in Minecraft. And given that there are 145 of them, that’s plenty of reading to do.

4. Amazing Activity Book For Minecrafters

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One of the major reasons kids read less and less these days is that, since video games are so ubiquitous, they increasingly feel that entertainment should be interactive. Of course, logically, this means that one of the best ways to keep your kid entertained away from the screen is with book-based interactive puzzles.

This book, an unofficial publication, provides kids with a variety of book-based activities themed around Minecraft. There are mazes, crosswords, and spot-the-difference puzzles, all designed to satiate your kid’s drive for fun interactivity while getting them away from the screen for a little while.

5. Craft Projects For Minecraft and Pixel Art Fans

Minecraft is a game that, with the sheer amount of freedom it offers players, really fosters tremendous creativity. This book is the kind of thing to give your kid when you’d like to see them take this newfound propensity for creativity beyond the computer screen.

The author provides clear instructions for fifteen fun, inexpensive crafting activities, allowing kids to make toys and accessories themed after Minecraft. It’s a fantastic way to introduce kids to the fact that their creative drive doesn’t have to be restricted to the digital world.

6. Learning To Draw For Minecrafters

Another excellent way for young Minecraft players to build upon their creativity, this book, as the title implies, provides kids with easy-to-follow instructions for drawing Minecraft characters. The geometric, blocky nature of these characters naturally makes them easier for a young artist to draw than something more realistic.

Meanwhile, the familiarity of the characters will make the drawing process several times more fun than drawing something less familiar. It’s a great way to help your young artists discover their talent.

7. Learn To Programme With Minecraft

Programming is one of those skills that is going to be pretty much invaluable for the next few years. Computers are a major part of every industry, and developing and editing computer programs is going to be pretty consistently lucrative. In other words, teaching your kids to program from a young age could be invaluable in their future careers.

This book is an ideal way to introduce kids to programming. As anyone who’s played Minecraft knows, the game’s modding community is absolutely thriving, in great part because of how easily programmable the game is. This book provides kids with an easy, accessible guide to programming their game in Python, allowing them to add their own creative twist to their game while learning invaluable skills at the same time.

8. Minecraft: The Island

The first official Minecraft novel, this one is penned by Max Brooks – don’t worry, though, it’s a lot more family-friendly than The Zombie Survival Guide or World War Z.

Following a young castaway’s efforts to survive the dangers of the world of Minecraft, the narrative will resonate tremendously with the many young players familiar with the innumerable challenges and thrills that the average game of Minecraft can throw at you while teaching them that adventures don’t have to be restricted to the screen.

9. Diary of a Minecraft Zombie

Zombies have been a feature of Minecraft since the game’s early days. This book by Zack Zombie, likely inspired by Jeff Kinney’s bestselling Diary of a Wimpy Kid series, places players in the shoes of a twelve-year-old Minecraft zombie and those of his human friend Steve as they learn lessons about acceptance and compassion.

It’s one in a lengthy series, and it’s packed with the sort of kid-friendly humor that’ll really do its part to ensure that your kids develop a positive impression of reading.

10. Diary of an Eight-Bit Warrior

Drawing on much the same inspiration as the previous book, this series of kids’ adventure novels follows a Minecraft villager, Runt, on his quest to become a warrior – which, as any Minecraft player knows, is a profession not generally open to villagers.

A classic story of determination and following one’s dreams, it’s ideal for young Minecraft players who normally wouldn’t be inclined to pick up a book on their own.

11. Invasion of the Overworld

The chances are that every young Minecraft player has dreamt of experiencing life in the game itself. This book by Mark Cheverton, the first in the Gameknight999 series of books, follows a young Minecraft player with a propensity for trolling other players as he is teleported into the game by his father’s new invention.

It’s the sort of fun concept that taps directly into a modern young gamer’s fancies. At the same time, it teaches valuable lessons about being courteous and considerate of others during online interactions, which, if we’re honest, is just as important as teaching offline courtesy nowadays.

12. The Quest: The Untold Story of Steve

Another Minecraft-based narrative, this one tells the story of a boy whose single-player game of Minecraft is disrupted by half-built homes, overpowered mobs, and other strange occurrences.

It kind of calls to mind the Herobrinecreepypasta, but more kid-friendly. Either way, while the Minecraft setting is likely what will initially get the kids reading the book, the mystery that runs throughout the narrative will likely be what keeps them reading.

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Amar is the Chief Nerd at Nerd Bear and can be mostly found binge-watching Netflix, researching tech, shooting things on PS4, and arguing over who is the strongest Avenger.
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